Getting the most out of your new fastpitch softball bats

Getting the most out of your new fastpitch softball batsCongratulations. You just took a big step in improving your softball game. Your decision to buy a great new fastpitch bat will definitely pay off. Here are some tips to get the most out of your new fastpitch bat for many years to come:

Ideal use is in warmer weather. Softballs become much harder when the weather is colder (under 60 degrees F). This could damage a high performance bat.

Only use regulation Softballs. Don’t use any softballs that exceed 525 pounds of compression.

Do not use your bat with Cage balls. These balls are typically harder and could damage your bat. In many cases, this could void your warranty.

Bats have a longer life when used solely for individual batting. Team use may decrease the life of the bat.

Composite fastpitch softball bats may require a break-in period.

Rotate the bat after each hit by ¼ turn. This will even the distribution of the hits which the bat will take. This will help to reduce flat spots that could occur.

For cleaning, use a soft cloth, warm water and any mild dish soap. Avoid using any solvents or products containing ammonia. These could damage the finish of the bat.

Store your bat in a Bat Bag or Bat Pak so that it remains protected when not in use.

Following these simple tips should help you to get many years of use out of your new bat.

Breaking-in your new fastpitch softball bat

While Aluminum bats are ready to be used immediately, composite bats (without NanoTek technology) typically require a break-in period. During the break-in period, the materials in the bat will break down. This will create a better trampoline effect for greater distance when the ball hits the bat. Because of this, composite bats are more forgiving if you don’t hit the sweet spot of the bat. While there are many different schools of thought in regards to the break-in steps, the main goal is to simulate hundreds of hits on the bat before its ready for peak performance.

Suggested steps for breaking-in your new bat:

First, verify that your bat requires a break-in period. In many instances, newer technology eliminates this need. If the manufacturer suggests that it’s not needed, you should be ready to play ball.

With a light soft mallet, lightly hit are the areas in the bat. Work your way around the entire bat. This will help to break down the material of the bat.

Hit around 25-50 softballs from a batting tee using around 25% of your power. By using a tee, you’ll have control over where the ball will hit the bat. Turn the bat after each hit to use a different area each time.

Continue with 100 more hits off the tee, increasing your power to about 50%.
Continue hitting with additional balls either pitched from a friend or a pitching machine. Again continue to rotate the impact spot of the bat.

The number of hits required will vary depending on the bat. Sometimes it can take up to 500 hits to get the most optimal performance from your bat.

Experienced players will admit that their bat definitely performs better after a proper break-in period. They experience amazing results which are well worth the effort of the break-in.

If you can follow through with the break-in steps above, you’ll enjoy this type of peak performance as well. If you’re not willing to put the effort into breaking in your new fastpitch softball bats, consider a model that does not require a break-in period.

Worth Baseball Bats – Is it worth it!

fastpitch softball batsWell, the Worth Baseball bats are the new entrants in the baseball market and they have a long way to go before they catch up with their elder brothers and get a prominent share in the world market. The Worth line of bats has a lot to offer, but it is nothing new and hence you cannot differentiate them from the other bats already available and doing good. So the Worth Baseball Bats will have to find their own special advantage before they become a rage in the youngsters mind and sell in huge numbers. This company though new and inexperienced has a lot of promise and is making changes in the positive direction, hence it can be easily said that the future holds light for the Worth Baseball Bats and is sure to be at the top at some point of time in its career.

Lets look at what is in store for us, when we talk about Worth Baseball Bats:

The 100% Composite Range:

– Mayhem Comp – This range is for the youngsters playing either in the school level or in the collegiate level. This comes as a one piece bat with both the flex handle and the stiff handle. As the name suggests, it plans to create mayhem in the opponent camp but, that is not the cause always, because the barrel is thin and this results in a reduced sweet spot. The company is looking into this flaw very seriously and plans to overcome it and make the Mayhem a number one seller.

– Titan – This range is for the adult age group playing the senior and the pro levels. This comes in the same specifications as the Mayhem, the only difference being that it allows the hitter more power and range. Thus the more powerful and worked up arms of the adults will make the ball go the distance. But again the bat does not have the fire power to prove itself and so it falls flat on its face. Hence the hitters would be tempted to buy bats that provide them with more fire power and a better score.

The 100% Alloy Range:

– Lithium Prodigy: This is for the young players who are just venturing into the field of playing baseball and this bat has been made keeping them in mind. But one very important thing is missing – the specific details about the handle. So, it cannot be recommended and hence losses out on the market share, which would have come its way.

– Edge: This is the same as Lithium Prodigy, just that the bat sell under this brand name in the senior league.

– AMP: This bat is the same as the Lithium Prodigy, just that the bat sell under this brand in the adult level.

And there are few other not so famous brands like the Mutant, Prodigy and the Copperhead, you may want to visit for more reviews on fastpitch softball bats. These are the bottom priced range and have not much to say about. Hence, we can easily conclude that Worth Baseball Bats are not to be used until unless you have no other options.

Corked Vs. Maple Baseball Bats

Maple Baseball Bats

Baseball-MuppetsBaseball bats have traditionally been made out of ash wood. Ever since the first baseball bats were created by the first baseball bat makers and until recent days, little had changed, but of late, maple-built baseball bats have been gaining terrain in front of the good old ash because of increased performances some of the professional league players have achieved by using them.

As opposed to ash, maple bats have been known to be more resistant and lighter, which makes for a lengthier life span and as such, a better investment (despite the fact that the price of maple baseball bats is higher than that of ash bats). You will also have a wider variety to choose from if you are looking into buying maple bats because most of the manufacturers these days are using maple, whereas the ranks of those who manufacture ash bats are growing thinner.

The fact that maple baseball bats have seen a rise in their popularity has prompted baseball bat manufacturers to create more and more maple bats, sometimes utilizing types of inferior maple wood. If you are looking into buying a maple baseball bat and you are being offered an unbelievably good deal, you might be well served if you would ask what kind of maple the bat is made of. As such, the winning maple baseball bats are made out of sugar maple or rock maple, whereas the less competitive ones, or rather, the ones you would risk getting ripped off with are made out of red and silver maple.

Corked Baseball Bats

A corked baseball bat is a term that is often used in the world of baseball but not everyone knows exactly what it means. Corked baseball bats are bats that have had the inside drilled out and have then been refilled with cork or other light materials. This sort of practice aims to make the bat lighter overall so that the person using it can move faster, giving the swing a higher velocity. Using a corked baseball bat will also make the strength with which the ball is hit smaller, but not by a sufficient margin so as to matter very much, especially in the hands of an experienced player.

Creating corked baseball bats is relatively simple and consists of drilling the end of the bat and filling the resulted hole (about 1inch wide and 10 inches long) with cork or other light materials that would prevent the sound of the bat hitting the ball to be different from that of a regular bat.

The practice of using corked baseball bats has been outlawed in professional competitions and players who use such bats are usually penalized for it. Some of the world’s best players have been assigned penalties for using corked baseball bats, which can seem puzzling, because given their previous performances, there would be no reason for them to need to cork their bats. The argument also exists that corking a bat will not help the batting but instead will give the player a much needed psychological edge.